Search catalog for:

Black History Month 2022 Art Contest

Celebrate Black History Month 2022 with the New Orleans Public Library’s annual art contest. This year’s theme is Ways we Stay Healthy: Health and Wellness in the Black Community. From the Black Panther Party’s People’s Free Medical Clinics to ways to stay healthy during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and beyond, Orleans Parish students in grades K-12 are invited to share art inspired by health and wellness in the Black community. All participants will receive a free book.

View our entry form for more details on how to participate in this year’s art competition.

Ready to start creating your Black History Month art? We’ve compiled the following guide to provide you with resources, information, and inspiration. 

Featured Database: 

  • BookFlix features pairings of gently animated fiction picture books with thematically-linked non-fiction e-books. Enjoy books about healthy activities such as cooking, gardening, eating, hiking, sleeping, and enjoying fun with friends.  

Recommended Reads for Black History Month

DVDs in Our Collection: 

  • Doc McStuffins: School of Medicine and other Doc McStuffins DVDs 

Online Resources:  

  • Therapy for Black Girls is an online space dedicated to encouraging the mental wellness of Black women and girls. 
  • EmbraceRace is a website full of tools and resources for raising children who are “thoughtful, informed, and brave about race.” 

Local Organizations: 

Ashé Cultural Arts Center uses art and culture to support human, community, and economic development. 

Project Butterfly New Orleans is a local group that is devoted to women and girls of African descent in the community. The website offers information about its various culturally-rooted programs and workshops. 

BreakOUT! seeks to end the criminalization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and gender non-confomring (TGNC), queer, nonbinary, and intersex (LGBTQI) youth to build a more just New Orleans. We inherit the rich cultural tradition of resistance in the Deep South to mobilize the power of LGBTQI Black, African Diasporic, Latinx, Asian, Indigenous, Arab, and multi-racial youth, ages 13+ directly impacted by the criminal legal system through youth organizing, healing justice, and leadership development. 

East New Orleans Regional Library

East New Orleans Library: A Community Pillar for 53 Years

When East New Orleans Regional Library first opened on Read Boulevard in 1968, it was the largest in the New Orleans Public Library system. In the five decades since, the Library has served as a pillar of the community, particularly during Hurricane Katrina recovery efforts in the area, which was devastated by the storm. E

Read More »